Three Must Eat Breakfast Foods

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Do you love your breakfast?  Do you have a short list of “go-to” recipes?  Do you need a bit of inspiration to start eating breakfast again?

Getting some protein at each meal can help with blood sugar management, metabolism and weight loss.  This is because protein helps you feel fuller longer and uses up a bunch of calories to absorb and metabolize it.  So I’m going to show you how to get the protein, as well as some veggies and healthy fats for your soon to be favorite new “go-to” breakfasts.

 

Breakfast Food #1: Eggs

 

Yes, eggs are the “quintessential” breakfast food, and for good reason!  Who remembers the catchy “the incredible, edible egg” commercials?No, I’m not talking about processed egg whites in a carton.  I mean actual whole “eggs”.

Egg whites are mostly protein while the yolks are the real nutritional powerhouses.  Those yolks contain vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, and healthy fats.  Eggs have been shown to help you feel full, keep you feeling fuller longer, and help to stabilize blood sugar and insulin.  Not to mention how easy it is to boil a bunch of eggs and keep them in the fridge for a “grab and go” breakfast when you’re running short on time.

And…MYTH BUSTER, the cholesterol in eggs is not associated with an increased risk of arterial or heart diseases.

One thing to consider is to try to prevent cooking the yolks at too high of a temperature because that can cause some of the cholesterol to become oxidized.  It’s the oxidized cholesterol that’s heart unhealthy.

Breakfast Food #2: Nuts and/or Seeds

 

Nuts and seeds contain protein, healthy fats, vitamins, minerals, and fiber.  Nuts and/or seeds would make a great contribution to breakfast.

Don’t be fooled by “candied” nuts, sweetened nut/seed butters, or chia “cereals” with added sugars – you know I’m talking about the real, whole, unsweetened food here.

Nuts and seeds are also the ultimate fast food if you’re running late in the mornings.  Grab a small handful of almonds, walnuts, or pumpkin seeds as you’re running out the door; you can nosh on them while you’re commuting.  Not to mention how easy it is to add a spoonful of nut/seed butter into your morning breakfast smoothie.

You could also level up your morning caffeine. If you like a creamy latte in the mornings try making one with nut or seed butter.  Just add your regular hot tea and a tablespoon or two of a creamy nut or seed butter into your blender & blend until frothy.

 

Breakfast Food #3: Veggies

 

Yes, you already know you really should get protein at every meal including breakfast; but this also applies to veggies.  You know I would be remiss to not recommend veggies at every meal, right?

Veggies are powerhouses of vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, phytochemicals, fiber, and water.  You can’t go wrong adding them into every single meal of the day so if you don’t already you should definitely try them for breakfast.  You don’t need to have a salad or roasted veggies for breakfast if you don’t want to, but you can.

Adding some protein to leftover veggies is a great combination for any meal.  Including breakfast.

 

I’ve included a delicious recipe below for you to try (and customize) for your next breakfast.

 

Recipe (Eggs & Veggies): Veggie Omelet

Serves 1

 

1 teaspoon coconut oil

1 or 2 eggs (how hungry are you?)

¼ cup veggies (grated zucchini and/or sliced mushrooms and/or diced peppers)

dash salt, pepper and/or turmeric

 

Add coconut oil to a frying pan and melt on low-medium heat

In the meantime grab a bowl and beat the egg(s) with your vegetables of choice and the spices.

Tilt pan to ensure the bottom is covered with the melted oil.  Pour egg mixture into pan and lightly fry the eggs without stirring.

When the bottom is lightly done flip over in one side and cook until white is no longer runny.

 

Serve & Enjoy!

 

Tip:  Substitute grated, sliced, or diced portion of your favourite vegetable.  Try grated carrots, chopped broccoli or diced tomato.

 

Yours in Health,

 

Dr. G

 

http://www.precisionnutrition.com/eggs-worse-than-fast-food

 

http://www.precisionnutrition.com/encyclopedia/food/eggs/

 

https://authoritynutrition.com/eating-healthy-eggs/

 

https://authoritynutrition.com/12-best-foods-to-eat-in-morning/

Why Your Waist Circumference Matters

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Why Your Waist Circumference Matters….More Than What You Weigh

 

 

You want to ditch your scale?  You may have a unique relationship with your “weight”.

You try to not have it define you.  What you weigh can matter but only to a certain extent.

Let’s look at waist circumference and what it can mean for you…

 

Waist Circumference (AKA “Belly Fat”):

 

Do you remember the fruity body shape descriptions being like an “apple” or a “pear”?  The apple is kind of round around the middle (you know – belly fat-ish, beer belly-ish) and the pear is rounder around the hips/thighs.

THAT is what we’re talking about here.

Do you know which shape is associated with a higher risk of sleep apnea, blood sugar issues (e.g. insulin resistance and diabetes) and heart issues (high blood pressure, blood fat, and arterial diseases).

You may have guessed it – the apple!

 

And it’s not because of the subcutaneous (under the skin) fat that you may refer to as a “muffin top”.  The health risk is actually due to the fat inside the abdomen covering the liver, intestines and other organs there.

This internal fat is called “visceral fat” and that’s where a lot of the problem actually is.  It’s this “un-pinchable” fat.

The reason the visceral fat can be a health issue is because it releases fatty acids, inflammatory compounds, and hormones that can negatively affect your blood fats, blood sugars, and blood pressure.

 

And the apple-shaped people tend to have a lot more of this hidden visceral fat than the pear-shaped people do.

So as you can see where your fat is stored is more important that how much you weigh.

 

Am I an apple or a pear?

It’s pretty simple to find out if you’re in the higher risk category or not. The easiest way is to just measure your waist circumference with a measuring tape.  You can do it right now.

Women, if your waist is 35” or more you could be considered to have “abdominal obesity” and be in the higher risk category.  Pregnant ladies are exempt, of course.  For men the number is 40”.

 

Of course this isn’t a diagnostic tool and there are lots of risk factors for chronic diseases.  Waist circumference is just one of them.

If you have concerns definitely see your primary care healthcare professional.

 

Tips for helping to reduce some belly fat:

 

  • Eat more fiber. Fiber can help reduce belly fat in a few ways.  First of all it helps you feel full and also helps to reduce the amount of calories you absorb from your food.  Some examples of high-fiber foods are brussel sprouts, flax and chia seeds, avocado, and blackberries.
  • Add more protein to your day. Protein reduces your appetite and makes you feel fuller longer.  It also has a high TEF (thermic effect of food) compared with fats and carbs and ensures you have enough of the amino acid building blocks for your muscles.
  • Avoid added sugars. This means ditch the processed sweetened foods especially those sweet drinks (even 100% pure juice).
  • Move more and sit less. Get some aerobic exercise.  Lift some weights.  Walk and take the stairs.  It all adds up.
  • Reduce stress. Elevated levels in the stress hormone cortisol have been shown to increase appetite and drive abdominal fat.
  • Get more sleep. Try making this a priority and seeing how much better you feel and look.

 

Recipe (High fiber side dish): Garlic Lemon Roasted Brussel Sprouts

Serves 4

 

1 lb brussel sprouts (washed, ends removed, halved)

2-3 cloves of garlic (minced)

2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice

dash salt and pepper

 

Preheat oven to 400F.

In a bowl toss sprouts with garlic, oil, and lemon juice.  Spread on a baking tray and season with salt and pepper.

Bake for about 15 minutes.  Toss.

Bake for another 10 minutes.

Serve and Enjoy!

 

Fun Fact:  Brussel sprouts contain the fat-soluble bone-loving vitamin K.  You may want to eat them more often.

 

References:

www.precisionnutrition.com/research-abdominal-fat-and-risk

www.precisionnutrition.com/visceral-fat-location

www.drsharma.ca/inspiring-my-interest-in-visceral-fat

www.hsph.harvard.edu/obesity-prevention-source/obesity-definition/abdominal-obesity/

www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fn-an/nutrition/weights-poids/guide-ld-adult/qa-qr-pub-eng.php#a4

www.authoritynutrition.com/6-proven-ways-to-lose-belly-fat/

www.authoritynutrition.com/20-tips-to-lose-belly-fat/

Why is My Metabolism Slow?

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You may feel tired, cold or that you’ve gained weight. Maybe your digestion seems a bit more “sluggish”.

You may be convinced that your metabolism is slow.  Which leads you to ask some of the following questions.

Why does this happen?

Why do metabolic rates slow down? 

What can slow my metabolism?

Metabolism includes all of the biochemical reactions in your body that use nutrients and oxygen to create energy. And there are lots of factors that affect how quickly (or slowly) it works, i.e. your “metabolic rate” (which is measured in calories).

But don’t worry – we know that metabolic rate is much more complicated than the old adage “calories in calories out”! In fact it’s so complicated I’m only going to list some of the more common things that can slow it down.

Examples of common reasons why metabolic rates can slow down:
● low thyroid hormone
● your history of dieting
● your size and body composition
● your activity level
● lack of sleep

We’ll briefly touch on each one below and I promise to give you better advice than just to “eat less and exercise more”.

Low thyroid hormones

Your thyroid is the master controller of your metabolism. When it produces fewer hormones your metabolism slows down. The thyroid hormones (T3 & T4) tell the cells in your body when to use more energy and become more metabolically active. Ideally it should work to keep your metabolism just right. But there are several things that can affect it and throw it off course. Things like autoimmune diseases and mineral deficiencies (e.g. iodine or selenium) for example.

Tip: Talk with your doctor about having your thyroid hormones tested.

Your history of dieting

When people lose weight their metabolic rate often slows down. This is because the body senses that food may be scarce and adapts by trying to continue with all the necessary life functions and do it all with less food.

While dieting can lead to a reduction in amount of fat, it unfortunately can also lead to a reduction in the amount of muscle you have. As you know more muscle means faster resting metabolic rate.

Tip: Make sure you’re eating enough food to fuel your body without overdoing it.

Your size and body composition

In general, larger people have faster metabolic rates. This is because it takes more energy to fuel a larger body than a smaller one.

However, you already know that gaining weight is rarely the best strategy for increasing your metabolism.

Muscles that actively move and do work need energy. Even muscles at rest burn more calories than fat. This means that the amount of energy your body uses depends partly on the amount of lean muscle mass you have.

Tip: Do some weight training to help increase your muscle mass.

Which leads us to…

Your activity level

Aerobic exercise temporarily increases your metabolic rate. Your muscles are burning fuel to move and do “work” and you can tell because you’re also getting hotter.

Even little things can add up. Walking a bit farther than you usually do, using a standing desk instead of sitting all day, or taking the stairs instead of the elevator can all contribute to more activity in your day.

Tip: Incorporate movement into your day. Also, exercise regularly.

Lack of sleep

There is plenty of research that shows the influence that sleep has on your metabolic rate. The general consensus is to get 7-9 hours of sleep every night.

Tip: Try to create a routine that allows at least 7 hours of sleep every night.

 

Yours in Health,

Dr. G

 

As always here’s your recipe to try!

Recipe: Chocolate Chia Seed Pudding

Serves 4

½ cup Brazil nuts
2 cups water
nut bag or several layers of cheesecloth (optional)
½ cup chia seeds
¼ cup unsweetened cacao powder
½ teaspoon ground cinnamon
¼ teaspoon sea salt
1 tablespoon maple syrup

Blend Brazil nuts in water in a high-speed blender until you get smooth, creamy milk. If desired, strain it with a nut bag or several layers of cheesecloth.

Add Brazil nut milk and other ingredients into a bowl and whisk until combined. Let sit several minutes (or overnight) until desired thickness is reached.

Serve & Enjoy!

Tip: Makes a simple delicious breakfast or dessert topped with berries.

 

References:

http://www.precisionnutrition.com : metabolic damage, thyroid and testing & all about energy balance

https://authoritynutrition.com/6-mistakes-that-slow-metabolism/

https://authoritynutrition.com/10-ways-to-boost-metabolism/

SLEEP Through the Night

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Have you said “bye bye” to sleeping through the night?

Are you feeling exhausted or “running on stress hormones” all day?

Do not fear, I have some great tips (and an amazing recipe) for you!

 

The science of sleep is fascinating, complicated and growing

Sleep is this daily thing that we all do and yet we’re just beginning to understand all of the ways it helps us and all of the factors that can affect it.

Lack of sleep affects just about everything in your body and mind.  People who get less sleep tend to be at higher risk for so many health issues like diabetes, heart disease, and certain types of cancer; not to mention effects like slower metabolism, weight gain, hormone imbalance, and inflammation.  And don’t forget the impact lack of sleep can have on moods, memory and decision-making skills.

Do you know that lack of sleep may even negate the health benefits of your exercise program? …….. What aspect of health does sleep not affect???

Knowing this it’s easy to see the three main purposes of sleep:

  • To restore our body and mind. Our bodies repair, grow and even “detoxify” our brains while we sleep.
  • To improve our brain’s ability to learn and remember things, technically known as “synaptic plasticity”.
  • To conserve some energy so we’re not just actively “out and about” 24-hours a day, every day.

Do you know how much sleep adults need?  It’s less than your growing kids need but you may be surprised that it’s recommended that all adults get 7 – 9 hours a night, so TRY not to skimp!

Don’t worry, I have you covered with a bunch of actionable tips below.

 

Tips for better sleep       

 

  • The biggest tip is definitely to try to get yourself into a consistent sleep schedule. Make it a priority and you’re more likely to achieve it.  This means turning off your lights 8 hours before your alarm goes off.  Days. A. Week.  I know weekends can easily throw this off but by making sleep a priority for a few weeks your body and mind will adjust and thank you for it.

 

  • Balance your blood sugar throughout the day. You know, eat less refined and processed foods and more whole foods (full of blood-sugar-balancing fiber).  Choose the whole orange instead of the juice (or orange-flavoured snack).  Make sure you’re getting some protein every time you eat.

 

  • During the day get some sunshine and exercise. These things tell your body it’s daytime; time for being productive, active and alert.  By doing this during the day it will help you wind down more easily in the evening.

 

  • Cut off your caffeine and added sugar intake after 12pm. Whole foods like fruits and veggies are fine, it’s the “added” sugar we’re minimizing.  Yes, this includes your beloved chai latte.  Both caffeine and added sugar can keep your mind a bit more active than you want it to be come evening. (HINT: I have a great caffeine-free chai latte recipe for you below!).

 

  • Have a relaxing bedtime routine that starts 1 hour before your “lights out” time (that is 8 – 10 hours before your alarm is set to go off). This would include dimming your artificial lights, nixing screen time and perhaps reading an (actual, not “e”) book or having a bath.

 

So how many of these tips can you start implementing today?

 

Yours in Health,

Dr. G

 

Enjoy this tasty recipe!

 

Recipe (Caffeine-free latte for your afternoon “coffee break”): Caffeine-Free Chai Latte

Serves 1-2

1 bag of rooibos chai tea (rooibos is naturally caffeine-free)

2 cups of boiling water

1 tablespoon tahini

1 tablespoon almond butter (creamy is preferred)

2 dates (optional)

 

Cover the teabag and dates (if using) with 2 cups of boiling water and steep for a few minutes.

Discard the tea bag & place tea, soaked dates, tahini & almond butter into a blender.

Blend until creamy.

Serve and Enjoy!

Tip:  You can try this with other nut or seed butters to see which flavor combination you like the best.  Cashew butter anyone?

 

References:

http://www.thepaleomom.com/gotobed/ 

http://www.precisionnutrition.com/hacking-sleep

Coffee – Who can drink and who should avoid?

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Coffee – Who can drink it and who should avoid it?                                                       

 

Coffee is one of those things – you either love it or hate it. You know if you like the taste or not (or if it’s just a reason to drink sugar and cream). You know how it makes you feel (i.e. your gut, your mind, etc.).

Not to mention the crazy headlines that say coffee is great, and the next day you should avoid it!

There is actual science behind why different people react differently to it. It’s a matter of your genetics and how much coffee you’re used to drinking.

NOTE: Coffee does not equal caffeine. Coffee contains between 50-400 mg of caffeine/cup, averaging around 100 mg/cup. Coffee is one of the most popular ways to consume this stimulant. But… a cup of coffee contains a lot of things over and above the caffeine. Not just water, but antioxidants, and hundreds of other compounds. These are the reasons drinking a cup of coffee is not the same as taking a caffeine pill. And decaffeinated coffee has a lot less caffeine; but, it still contains some.

Let’s look at caffeine metabolism, its effects on the mind and body, and whether coffee drinkers have higher or lower risks of disease. Then I’ll give you some things to consider when deciding if coffee is for you or not.

Caffeine metabolism

 

Not all people metabolize caffeine at the same speed. How fast you metabolize caffeine will impact how you’re affected by the caffeine. In fact, caffeine metabolism can be up to 40x faster in some people than others.

About half of us are “slow” metabolizers of caffeine. We can get jitters, heart palpitations, and feel “wired” for up to 9 hours after having a coffee. The other half is “fast” metabolizers of caffeine. They get energy and increased alertness and are back to normal a few hours later.

This is part of the reason those headlines contradict each other so much – because we’re all different!

 

The effects of coffee (and caffeine) on the mind and body

 

NOTE: Most studies look at caffeinated coffee, not decaf.

The effects of coffee (and caffeine) on the mind and body also differ between people; this is partly from the metabolism I mentioned. But it also has to do with your body’s amazing ability to adapt (read: become more tolerant) to long-term caffeine use. Many people who start drinking coffee feel the effects a lot more than people who have coffee every day.

Here’s a list of these effects (that usually decrease with long-term use):

  • Stimulates the brain
  • Boosts metabolism
  • Boosts energy and exercise performance
  • Increases your stress hormone cortisol
  • Dehydrates

So, while some of these effects are good and some aren’t, you need to see how they affect you and decide if it’s worth it or not.

 

Coffee and health risks

 

There are a ton of studies on the health effects of coffee, and whether coffee drinkers are more or less likely to get certain conditions.

Here’s a quick summary of what coffee can lead to:

  • Caffeine addiction and withdrawal symptoms (e.g. a headache, fatigue, irritability)
  • Increased sleep disruption
  • Lower risk of Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s
  • Lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes
  • Lower risk of certain liver diseases
  • Lower risk of death (“all cause mortality”)
  • Mixed reviews on whether it lowers risks of cancer and heart disease

Many of the health benefits exist even for decaf coffee (except the caffeine addiction and sleep issues).

NOTE: What’s super-important to note here is that coffee intake is just one of many, many factors that can affect your risks for these diseases. Please never think regular coffee intake is the one thing that can help you overcome these risks. You are health-conscious and know that eating a nutrient-rich whole foods diet, reducing stress, and getting enough sleep and exercise are all critical things to consider for your disease risk. It’s not just about the coffee.

 

Should you drink coffee or not?

 

There are a few things to consider when deciding whether you should drink coffee. No one food or drink will make or break your long-term health.

 

Caffeinated coffee is not recommended for:

  • People with arrhythmias (e.g. irregular heartbeat)
  • People who often feel anxious
  • People who have trouble sleeping
  • People who are pregnant
  • Children
  • Teenagers

If none of these apply, then monitor how your body reacts when you have coffee. Does it:

  • Give you the jitters?
  • Increase anxious feelings?
  • Affect your sleep?
  • Give you heart palpitations?
  • Affect your digestion (e.g. heartburn, etc.)?
  • Give you a reason to drink a lot of sugar and cream?

 

Depending on how your body reacts, decide whether these reactions are worth it to you. If you’re not sure, I recommend eliminating it for a while and see the difference.

 

Recipe (Latte): Pumpkin Spice Latte

 

Serves 1

3 tbsp coconut milk
1 ½ tsp pumpkin pie spice (or cinnamon)
¼ tsp vanilla extract
1 tbsp pumpkin puree

½ tsp maple syrup (optional)
1 cup coffee (decaf if preferred)

 

Instructions:

Add all ingredients to blender and blend until creamy.

Serve & enjoy!

Tip: You can use tea instead of milk if you prefer.

 

Yours in Health,

Dr. G

 

 

References:

 

https://authoritynutrition.com/coffee-good-or-bad/

 

http://www.precisionnutrition.com/all-about-coffee

 

http://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/a-wake-up-call-on-coffee

 

http://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/can-your-coffee-habit-help-you-live-longer-201601068938

 

http://suppversity.blogspot.ca/2014/05/caffeine-resistance-genetic.html

 

https://authoritynutrition.com/how-much-coffee-should-you-drink/

Everything You Think You Know About Healthy Eating is Wrong and It’s Making You Fat and Tired

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Everything You Think You Know About Healthy Eating is Wrong and it’s Making You Fat and Tired

 

 

Oh my gosh – nutrition and diet info is everywhere!

And each expert and association tries to lead you in their direction because they know best and their advice is going to help you.  Right?

 

Well, maybe…

Everyone has heard (and maybe lived through) the intense focus on how much you eat.  This has gotten way too much attention because while this does affect your weight and energy level, it’s certainly not the “holy grail” of health.

Let’s focus a bit more on the often overlooked (and proven) benefits of what you eat and drink and how you eat and drink it.

 

What you eat and drink

 

The “calories in, calories out” philosophy (i.e. how much you eat) is being drowned out with research on other factors that may be just as important.  Don’t get me wrong limiting calories, carbs or fat can certainly help you lose weight but that’s simply not the only factor for long-term weight loss and maximum energy for everyone.

When the intense focus on how much we ate didn’t work in the long-run it wasn’t really a surprise. We kinda knew that already, didn’t we?

You can certainly still continue to count your calories, carbs, and fat but don’t forget to also pay attention to what you eat.

Ideally, you need a varied diet full of minimally-processed foods (i.e. fewer “packaged” “ready-to-eat” foods).  This simple concept is paramount for weight loss, energy, and overall health and wellness.

 

Every day this is what you should aim for:

  • A colourful array of fruits and veggies at almost every meal and snack. You need the fiber, antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals.
  • Enough protein. Making sure you get all of those essential amino acids (bonus: eating protein can increase your metabolism).
  • Healthy fats and oils (never “hydrogenated” ones). There is a reason some fatty acids are called “essential” – you need them as building blocks for your hormones and brain as well as to be able to absorb essential fat-soluble vitamins from your uber-healthy salads.  Use extra virgin olive oil and coconut oil, eat your organic egg yolks, and get grass-fed meats when possible.  You don’t need to overdo it here.  Just make sure you’re getting some high-quality fats.

 

How you eat and drink

 

Also pay attention to how you eat and drink.

Studies are definitely showing that this has more of an impact than we previously thought.

Are you rushed, not properly chewing your food, and possibly suffering from gastrointestinal issues? Do you drink your food?

When it comes to how you eat let’s first look at “mindful eating”.

Mindful eating means to take smaller bites, eat slowly, chew thoroughly, and savor every bite.  Notice and appreciate the smell, taste and texture.  Breathe.

This gives your digestive system the hint to prepare for digestion and to secrete necessary enzymes.

This can also help with weight loss because eating slower often means eating less.  Did you know that it takes about 20 minutes for your brain to know that your stomach is full?

Thought so!

 

We also know that more thoroughly chewed food is easier to digest and it makes it easier to absorb all of those essential nutrients.

And don’t forget about drinking your food.

Yes, smoothies can be healthy and a fabulously easy and tasty way to get in some fruits and veggies (hello leafy greens!) but drinking too much food can contribute to a weight problem and feelings of sluggishness.

Don’t get me wrong a green smoothie can make an amazingly nutrient-dense meal and is way better than stopping for convenient junk food – just consider a large smoothie to be a full meal not a snack.  And don’t gulp it down too fast.

If your smoothies don’t fill you up like a full meal does try adding in a spoon of fiber like ground flax or chia seeds.

 

Summary:

 

Consider not only how much you eat but also what and how you eat it.

 

Yours in Health,

 

Dr. G

 

 

 

Recipe (Smoothie meal): Chia Peach Green Smoothie

 

Serves 1

 

handful spinach

1 tablespoon chia seeds

1 banana

1 chopped peach

1 cup unsweetened almond milk

 

Add ingredients to blender in order listed (you want your greens on the bottom by the blade so they blend better and have the chia on the bottom to absorb some liquid before you blend).

 

Wait a couple of minutes for the chia seeds to start soaking up the almond milk.

 

Blend, Serve and Enjoy!

 

Tip: Smoothies are the ultimate recipe for substitutions.  Try swapping different greens, fruit or seeds to match your preference.

 

Bonus: Chia seeds not only have fiber and essential omega-3 fatty acids but they  contain all of the essential amino acids from protein.

 

References:

 

http://summertomato.com/wisdom-wednesday-salad-dressing-is-your-friend

 

https://authoritynutrition.com/20-reasons-you-are-not-losing-weight/

 

http://summertomato.com/the-science-behind-mindful-eating-what-happens-to-your-body-during-a-mindful-meal

 

http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/nut-and-seed-products/3061/2

Three Ways to Avoid Overeating at Meals

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Three Ways to Avoid Overeating at Meals

 

Sometimes those holiday feasts are just amazing.

And it’s not just the abundance of delicious food but also the people, the decorations, and the ambiance.

It is way too easy (and common) to indulge on those days.

But it doesn’t always stop there.

Sometimes we overeat on regular days.  Or at regular meals.  Or All. The. Time.

Here are three tips to avoid overeating at meals.

(Psst, turn these into habits and ditch the willpower!)

 

Tip #1: Start with some water

 

When your stomach is growling and you smell amazingly delicious food it’s too easy to fill a plate (or grab some samples with your bare hands) and dive into the food.

But did you know that it’s possible to sometimes confuse the feeling of thirst with that of hunger?  Your stomach may actually be craving a big glass of water rather than a feast.

Some studies have shown that drinking a glass or two of water before a meal can help reduce the amount of food eaten.  And this super-simple tip may even help with weight loss (…just sayin’).

Not only will the water start to fill up your stomach before you get to the buffet, leaving less room for the feast but drinking enough water has been shown to slightly increase your metabolism.

Win-win!

 

Tip #2: Try eating “mindfully”

 

You’ve heard of mindfulness but have you applied that to your eating habits?

This can totally help you avoid overeating as well as having the added bonus of helping your digestion.

Just as being mindful when you meditate helps to focus your attention on your breathing and the present moment being mindful when you eat helps to focus your attention on your meal.

Do this by taking smaller bites, eating more slowly, chewing more thoroughly, and savoring every mouthful.  Notice and appreciate the smell, taste and texture.  Breathe.

This can help prevent overeating because eating slower often means eating less.

When you eat quickly you can easily overeat because it takes about 20 minutes for your brain to know that your stomach is full.

So take your time, pay attention to your food and enjoy every bite.

 

Bonus points: Eat at a table (not in front of the screen), off of a small plate, and put your fork down between bites.

 

Tip #3: Start with the salad

 

You may be yearning for that rich, creamy main dish.

But don’t start there.

(Don’t worry, you can have some…just after you’ve eaten your salad).

Veggies are a great way to start any meal because they’re full of not only vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, and health-promoting phytochemicals but they also have some secret satiety weapons: fiber and water.

Fiber and water are known to help fill you up and make you feel fuller.  They’re “satiating”.

And these secret weapons are great to have on your side when you’re about to indulge in a large meal.

 

Summary:

 

Have your glass of water, eat mindfully, and start with your salad to help avoid overeating at meals.

 

Recipe (Water): Tasty (and beautiful) Pre-Meal Water Ideas

 

If you’re not much of a plain water drinker or need your water to be more appealing to your senses here are five delicious (and beautiful looking) fruit combos to add to your large glass of water:

  • Slices of lemon & ginger
  • Slices of strawberries & orange
  • Slices of apple & a cinnamon stick
  • Chopped pineapple & mango
  • Blueberries & raspberries

 

Tip: You can buy a bag (or several bags) of frozen chopped fruit and throw those into your cup, thermos, or uber-cool mason jar in the morning.  They’re already washed and cut and will help keep your water colder longer.

 

References:

 

https://authoritynutrition.com/7-health-benefits-of-water/

 

http://summertomato.com/the-science-behind-mindful-eating-what-happens-to-your-body-during-a-mindful-meal

What is metabolism?

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What is Metabolism?

 

This word “metabolism” is thrown around a lot these days.

 

You know that if yours is too slow you might gain weight.  But what exactly does this all mean?

 

Well technically “metabolism” is the word to describe all of the biochemical reactions in your body.  It’s how you take in nutrients and oxygen and use them to fuel everything you do.

 

Your body has an incredible ability to grow, heal, and generally stay alive.  And without this amazing biochemistry you would not be possible.

 

Metabolism includes how the cells in your body:

  • Allow activities you can control (e.g. physical activity etc.).
  • Allow activities you can’t control (e.g. heart beat, wound healing, processing of nutrients & toxins, etc.).
  • Allow storage of excess energy for later.

 

So when you put all of these processes together into your metabolism you can imagine that these processes can work too quickly, too slowly, or just right.

 

Which brings us to the “metabolic rate”.

 

Metabolic rate

 

This is how fast your metabolism works and is measured in calories (yup, those calories!).

 

The calories you eat can go to one of three places:

  • Work (i.e. exercise and other activity).
  • Heat (i.e. from all those biochemical reactions).
  • Storage (i.e. extra leftover “unburned” calories stored as fat).

 

As you can imagine the more calories you burn as work or creating heat the easier it is to lose weight and keep it off because there will be fewer “leftover” calories to store for later.

 

There are a couple of different ways to measure metabolic rate.  One is the “resting metabolic rate” (RMR) which is how much energy your body uses when you’re not being physically active.

 

The other is the “total daily energy expenditure” (TDEE) which measures both the resting metabolic rate as well as the energy used for “work” (e.g. exercise) throughout a 24-hour period.

 

What affects your metabolic rate?

 

In a nutshell: a lot!

 

The first thing you may think of is your thyroid.  This gland at the front of your throat releases hormones to tell your body to “speed up” your metabolism.  Of course, the more thyroid hormone there is the faster things will work and the more calories you’ll burn.

 

But that’s not the only thing that affects your metabolic rate.

 

How big you are counts too!

 

Larger people have higher metabolic rates; but your body composition is crucial!

 

As you can imagine muscles that actively move and do work need more energy than fat does.  So the more lean muscle mass you have the more energy your body will burn and the higher your metabolic rate will be.  Even when you’re not working out.

 

This is exactly why weight training is often recommended as a part of a weight loss program.  Because you want muscles to be burning those calories for you.

 

The thing is, when people lose weight their metabolic rate often slows down which you don’t want to happen.  So you definitely want to offset that with more muscle mass.

 

Aerobic exercise also temporarily increases your metabolic rate.  Your muscles are burning fuel to move so they’re doing “work”.

 

The type of food you eat also affects your metabolic rate!

 

Your body actually burns calories to absorb, digest, and metabolize your food.  This is called the “thermic effect of food” (TEF).

 

You can use it to your advantage when you understand how your body metabolizes foods differently.

 

Fats, for example increase your TEF by 0-3%; carbs increase it by 5-10%, and protein increases it by 15-30%.  By trading some of your fat or carbs for lean protein you can slightly increase your metabolic rate.

 

Another bonus of protein is that your muscles need it to grow.  By working them out and feeding them what they need they will help you to lose weight and keep it off.

 

And don’t forget the mind-body connection.  There is plenty of research that shows the influence that things like stress and sleep have on the metabolic rate.

 

This is just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to metabolism and how so many different things can work to increase (or decrease) your metabolic rate.

 

Recipe (Lean Protein): Lemon Herb Roasted Chicken Breasts

 

Serves 4

 

2 lemons, sliced

1 tablespoon rosemary

1 tablespoon thyme

2 cloves garlic, thinly sliced

4 chicken breasts (boneless, skinless)

dash salt & pepper

1 tablespoon extra virgin olive old

 

Preheat oven to 425F.  Layer ½ of the lemon slices on the bottom of a baking dish.  Sprinkle with ½ of the herbs and ½ of the sliced garlic.

 

Place the chicken breasts on top and sprinkle salt & pepper.  Place remaining lemon, herbs and garlic on top of the chicken.  Drizzle with olive oil.  Cover with a lid or foil.

 

Bake for 45 minutes until chicken is cooked through.  If you want the chicken to be a bit more “roasty” then remove the lid/foil and broil for another few minutes (watching carefully not to burn it).

 

Serve & enjoy!

 

Tip: You can add a leftover sliced chicken breast to your salad for lunch the next day!

 

References:

http://www.precisionnutrition.com/all-about-energy-balance

 

https://authoritynutrition.com/10-ways-to-boost-metabolism/

What I Learned in 2017

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2018 is officially here! This means its time to reflect on the previous year and set some goals for the next. There are many ups and downs in which we have opportunities to learn and grow. This has always been one of my favorite posts to do because so much can happen in a year. I’ve put together a list, which is in no particular order. I hope you enjoy some of things I’ve learned this past year.

 

1.) When you point a finger, there’s three pointed right back at you.            

No matter the situation, odds are you’re at blame too. Blaming others can fall back on your own insecurities. I found it best to think before you speak or act and if you do “lash-out”, own up and make ammends for your actions. Life is too short to hold grudges. It will just stay in your heart and become a bitter part of your soul. Instead listen, think and be forgiving.

 

2.) Consistency is the key 

In all aspects of your life whether it be faith, family, personal, professional, friendship, fitness, leisure, nutritionally, etc….being consistent yields optimal outcomes. Establish S.M.A.R.T goals in all aspects of your life, so you can grow holistically. Many will choose to make a resolution of losing weight this new year, but I can tell you, it will be more challenging if you’re not working on the other aspects of your life. The cool thing is you can always adapt to how your life is changing, review your goals and modify as you see fit.

3.) When you grow in your faith, everything around you grows as well

As a family we gave more than we ever had and even encouraged our oldest son to give as well. It was more than tithing, as we always have. We gave at just about every opportunity that presented itself. Along with tithing, we were reading the bible regularly. There were daily devotionals and children’s bibles, which our oldest has read through over and over again. I read through the New Testament for the first time. Throughout all of this I found that family time was more meaningful, I grew closer to my family and had my best year professionally. Working on my faith helped to put everything into perspective and bring order into my life.

4.) There’s always an abundance of average, you have to make yourself standout

What makes you unique? What sets your apart? These are two questions I’ve found to be consistently evolving the longer I’m in practice. I sometimes get asked by patients – How did you learn this? How do you know what to do? I feel that this is a unique aspect in the quality of care I provide. I strive to “listen” to my patients and answer honestly. I also feel that what sets me apart is educating my patients on the “why” and demonstrating “how” I can help and how “we” can work together. Making patients a part of their care, rather than just receiving care.

5.) Communication is crucial 

I’ve really tried to work on effective communication this year. Sometimes I have to remind myself that if a 5 year old can’t understand it, it’s too complicated. Taking this into consideration while also recognizing that everyone needs things explained a different way has really helped.

6.) You have to get comfortable being uncomfortable

When you are working on growing and expanding there are plenty of times where you will doubt what you’re doing and where you will fail. There will also be plenty of times where you will succeed, make progress towards your goal, make new contacts for future expansion, etc. The important thing to remember is what are you striving for, what is your passion? What are the steps you need to take to get there? During these steps you will be uncomfortable and you have to embrace it, recognize the challenges and adapt to conquer them.

7.) What is your time worth?

I had an epiphany this summer/fall with this thought. There were several times when I did something so that I didn’t have to pay someone else to do it. One moment that really stands out is when I mowed the lawn when both my wife and I had the day off and both boys were home with us. I missed out on spending time with them, roughly an hour and a half. That’s time I can’t get back during such precious years of their lives. I read an article that went into this topic the very next day and the author simplified this dilemma with a calculation. How much money do you make in year / how many hours you work in a year = hourly $ amount worth. Ex. If you make $50,000/yr / 2,000 hrs worked = $25/hr. So if you you can pay someone to mow your lawn for $15, let them do it, it’s not worth your time. Instead, enjoy that time with family or whatever else you love doing!

8.) Recognizing that typically the main obstacle is ourselves

More often I find that I’m the reason for things not going as planned, whether it be not quite how I wanted it to be or things aren’t happening as fast as I think they should. Taking a step back, assessing and reevaluating can help you get passed a roadblock majority of the time. For the other times lean on your supporting cast for help.

9.) Always room to grow in your fellowship and friendships

I’ve met a lot of great people, have made several new friends and have become closer friends with many this year. For all of this I’m truly thankful!

10.) The need to establish balance

Balancing family, work, leisure, etc is a real challenge and can generate quite a bit of stress. Figuring out how to deal with it all is a part of life and at times we think we have it all figured out, but we have to remember that it’s okay to ask for help. I’ve had to ask for help and seek advice for various things over the years. Some things that have helped me are incorporating time management strategies, making to-do lists, learning to say “NO” and developing boundaries. I’ve made it a goal for 2018 to make sure neither one gets left out and that each is given the time it deserves.

 

 

 

I hope you enjoyed my top 10 list. If you haven’t already I encourage you to reflect on your 2017 and set some goals for 2018! As always feel free to like, share or leave a comment.

Yours in Health,

Dr. G

Move better, Feel Better, Function Better, Live better

Your Recovery Guide for 17.5

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The 2017 CrossFit Open is in the books!

It was a grueling 5 weeks that tested everything you had both physically and mentally….let’s throw in a third – emotionally.  For many it was your first Open and others you got to put your fitness to the test with a repeat in 17.4 from last year.  Individuals who have done it before can also look at how they progressed and compare by state, region and worldwide.  This is what makes it fun.  Odds are the vast majority of us will never make it to the CrossFit Games, but we all love a great competition and that’s what these last 5 weeks have been!

Here is your latest recovery guide, enjoy!

Recovery – Nutrition

1.) Check out 17.1’s guide

2.) Enjoy a cheat meal.  You deserve it!

Recovery – Mobility

Push your abdomen into your hand and rotate between your shoulder blades, exhaling as you turn your head.

 

Place a band in the front of your ankle and lunge forward

 

Recovery – Stability

Rock back towards your heel maintaining your front foot on the ground, especially your big toe.

Push your belly button out, expand your lower rib cage, keep your lower rib cage down and lower back into the floor, ie. abdominal brace, as you reach your arms overhead

Recovery – Treatment

1.) Chiropractic & Rehabilitation

2.) Massage Therapy

3.) Deep Tissue Laser Therapy

 

Along with these tips consider going for a run, bike, hike or swim to clear your mind and do something different.  Getting outside and enjoying nature can be very therapeutic.  Thanks for keeping up with the Recovery Guide’s this CrossFit Open.  I appreciate all of the positive feedback I’ve gotten from them.  I look forward to doing this again next year.  Take care everyone!

Yours in Health,

Dr. G

 

Did you miss the other Recovery Guides? Here they are Recovery 17.1, Recovery 17.2, Recovery 17.3, Recovery 17.4